Tuesday, August 23

"FORBIDDEN ZONES" ON RANCHER'S PRIVATE PROPERTY!

The flagship of the mainstream media -- the "New York Times" (registration required) -- reinforces with an article in today's edition the theme of the post I published yesterday afternoon, in which I linked to a trenchant column by Steve Sailer carried on the "VDARE" homepage. That theme: namely, that the MSM is beginning, albeit belatedly and reluctantly, to monitor the rising pulse of Americans disgruntled over runaway illegal immigration and the clear risk to homeland security of our nation's porous borders.

In the NYT article by Ralph Blumenthal, the plight of the Johnson family, New Mexico ranchers who collectively own 110,000 acres (property first settled by the Johnson's in 1918) along a stretch of the New Mexico-Mexico border and for whom the illegal immigration/porous borders issue has become so exacerbated that forbidden zones have been declared by the U.S. Border Patrol on the Johnson's private property, i.e., areas of ranch land so perpetually infiltrated by human smugglers and the illegal aliens they shepherd, that federal agents deem it unsafe for members of the Johnson family to venture there!

As Mr. Blumenthal concludes:

The feeling of helplessness is constant, but not altogether new. A dozen years ago, Joe Johnson said, he and his brother Bill were held up by five gunmen who took their pickup truck and fled toward Mexico, getting stuck in a ditch just before the border. About eight years ago, he said, 30 head of their cattle were herded into Mexico; a few were found alive before slaughter in Palomas.

"We just want to be left alone to earn a living," he said.

Fact is, American property owners along the contiguous U.S.-Mexico border are not being left alone, nor are those who live well inland from the border, but for whom fate and a do-nothing federal government has placed them in harm's way because their property and homes fall within the long drug-running, people-smuggling corridors that run like arteries into the heart of the southcentral-southwestern United States, and beyond, and which are ruthlessly protected.