Monday, March 28

MARK STEYN WRITES THE SUI GENERIS COLUMN ON TERRI SCHIAVO'S COURT-ORDERED DEATH

Those of us doing our level best in the blogosphere (many of whom are linked at BlogsforTerri and ProLifeBogs) to make a cogent case for life over death in the Terri Schindler Schiavo controversy, and to bring true facts to bear on this human tragedy, have no doubt been frustrated in our perceived failure to cause sufficient reflection among this nation's secularists to convince many in their flock that the sanctity of life ought to be championed by all Americans, rather than viewed as some sinister concept of the Christian Right designed to impinge on everyone's freedom.

Then along comes a column like Mark Steyn's and you realize that your efforts, while noble and persistent, pale in effect against the strength of superlative writing.

This is a column that needs to be linked widely in the blogosphere, as it may well be the sui generis column on this entire controversy!

A flavor of Mark's commentary:

This is not a criminal, not a murderer, not a person whose life should be in the gift of the state. So I find it repulsive, and indeed decadent, to have her continued existence framed in terms of ''plaintiffs'' and ''petitions'' and ''en banc review'' and ''de novo'' and all the other legalese. Mrs. Schiavo has been in her present condition for 15 years. Whoever she once was, this is who she is now -- and, after a decade and a half, there is no compelling reason to kill her. Any legal system with a decent respect for the status quo -- something too many American judges are increasingly disdainful of -- would recognize that her present life, in all its limitations, is now a well-established fact, and it is the most grotesque judicial overreaching for any court at this late stage to decide enough is enough. It would be one thing had a doctor decided to reach for the morphine and ''put her out of her misery'' after a week in her diminished state; after 15 years, for the courts to treat her like a Death Row killer who's exhausted her appeals is simply vile.

Michael Schiavo took a vow to be faithful in sickness and in health, forsaking all others till death do them part. He's forsaken his wife and been unfaithful to her: She is, de facto, his ex-wife, yet, de jure, he appears to have the right to order her execution. This is preposterous. Suppose his current common-law partner were to fall victim to a disabling accident. Would he also be able to have her terminated? Can he exercise his spousal rights polygamously? The legal deference to Mr. Schiavo's position, to his rights overriding her parents', is at odds with reality.

As to arguments about ''Congressional overreaching'' and ''states' rights,'' which is more likely? That Congress will use this precedent to pass bills keeping you -- yes, you, Joe Schmoe of 37 Elm Street -- alive till your 118th birthday. Or that the various third parties who intrude between patient and doctor in the American system -- next of kin, HMOs, insurers -- will see the Schiavo case as an important benchmark in what's already a drift toward a culture of convenience euthanasia. Here's a thought: Where do you go to get a living-will kit saying that in the event of a hideous accident I don't want to be put to death by a Florida judge or the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals? And, if you had such a living will, would any U.S. court recognize it?

Hat tip to Captain Ed.